OCR on Ubuntu 12.04

OCR LinuxScanning in an image and converting it to text is relatively straightforward in Linux provided you have the correct software installed. I plumped for Tesseract as it was reputedly the best command line OCR program but I also wanted to have a graphical user interface with it so I used gImageReader as a front-end to Tesseract.

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Create an ebook from the Linux command line

Two years ago, I wrote an article about how to create an ebook in Open Office. Since then, I've moved to creating ebooks using the linux command line because I found it quicker and a lot simpler: from a finished text, a Kindle ebook can be created in less than a minute - and its all completely free. The tools I use to create epub and Kindle ready books using the command line interface (CLI) are any text editor (emacs, nano, vi, etc), pandoc and KindleGen.

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Annotate images on Linux

Annotate screenshot LinuxAnnotating images in Windows is relatively straightforward. There are many tools available to do it, but on Linux there are not so many options. For my Google Classroom tutorials, I have been using some screen annotation software on Linux called Shutter which works really well and is as fast, if not faster, than some of the Windows variations.

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Which Shell Am I Using?

Which shell am I using?You can typically tell which family your shell belongs to by a character in the prompt that it displays. Bourne-type shells, such as bash , usually have $ in the prompt. The C shell uses % (but tcsh users often use >). If the shell that you use has superuser privileges, then the prompt usually ends with a hash, #.

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Gary Hall Gary Hall is based in East Yorkshire, England, and has a background in education, marketing and technology. This site is a collection of ideas and resources on these topics.