Coding Toys for Kids

There are loads of cool coding toys for kids on the market these days - they are growing in popularity all the time. So, as a parent, it can be difficult to know which is the best to choose for your child.

Here, we have picked out nine of the best kids coding toys from a range of top brands, so regardless of their age or previous experience of coding, you are sure to find something here they will love playing with and which will help them learn. Let’s dive straight in with our top picks.

1. Osmo Genius Starter Kit

The first of our STEM coding toys is the Genius Kit from Osmo. This one is best for kids between the ages of 6 - 10 years old and it requires an iPad for use. The game combines physical game pieces with virtual elements on the screen, for a unique, fun and educational play experience. There are a few different games that can be played with this set - there are tangram puzzle pieces, number and word tiles, and boxes to neatly store each set of pieces. Five games can be played using the pieces, and there are various difficulty levels to choose from, so you can tailor the game as your child grows and learns.

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2. Intelino Smart Train

Next up we have the awesome Smart Train from Intelino. It comes with everything needed to start playing and learning straight away - a train engine and wagon, track pieces, a charger, and more. The toy can be connected with an app, or used in screen-free mode, and the app is available on both iOS and Android. To control the train, kids must use the different colored blocks and arrange them on the track. Each color corresponds to a different action the train will take. Kids will have hours of fun making different track arrangements and guiding the train around it! The train can also work on most brands of wooden train tracks, so there’s plenty of room for expansion.

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3. PAI Technology Robot Kit

If you’re looking for toys that teach coding to younger children, this robot-building kit from PAI Technology is suitable for kids as young as 4 and will be enjoyed until they are around 7 years old. The kit comes with 130 pieces, which can be combined to build one of six different models. Or, kids can use their imagination and create their very own robot designs. There are 30 different coding puzzles and challenges to work through, and by completing these challenges, kids will learn skills such as looping and conditional coding. You can connect the robot to an iOS or Android device using the compatible app for maximum benefit. If you like the look of this toy, you can find more like it at tncore.org.

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4. Learning Resources Botley Robot

Next on our list of the best coding toys for kids, we have Learning Resources’ Botely, the coding robot. It’s ideal for kids as young as 5 years old to start their coding journey. By playing with this toy, kids can learn a range of important skills such as problem-solving and critical thinking, which are sure to prove valuable in the future. The robot is able to detect objects in front of it to avoid collisions, and can follow a path, or even an obstacle course! No phone or app is required to play with Botley, making it a great choice for younger kids who don’t have access to other devices. There are over 70 pieces in this set, and the robot has hidden features that can be unlocked, so it grows with your child as they learn.

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5. ThinkFun Code Master

ThinkFun make some of the best coding toys, and this logic game is no exception. It challenges kids to work through the different levels, 60 in total, using maps and action tokens to solve the coding challenges presented. It’s recommended for children over 8, and the challenges get progressively more difficult so it will keep them thinking all the time. There are solutions included if any of the challenges are too difficult to solve.

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6. Fisher Price Code-a-Pillar

If you’re buying for a younger child, the Code-a-Pillar from Fisher Price is suitable for kids as young as 3 years old. To use this toy, kids have to connect the different segments in an order, which will make the caterpillar before the actions on each segment. The head segment is motorized and has lights, and also plays sounds, all of which make this really appealing to younger kids. There are two discs included - one to mark the starting point and one for the finishing point. Can your child successfully guide Code-a-Pillar from the start to finish?

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7. Ozobot Bit Coding Robot

Next, we have this cool robot from Ozobot. It might be tiny, but that doesn’t mean it’s not full of awesome features. It doesn’t have to be assembled - it’s ready to start coding straight away. To use this robot, kids simply have to draw using different colored markers and the robot will perform certain commands based on this. To take things to the next level, there’s an online editor which kids can use to drag and drop, creating codes this way.

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8. Snap Circuits Junior

When it comes to coding toys for 10 year olds, you’ll want to choose something which is challenging enough to keep them entertained for hours. This set has over 30 parts which are used to build over 100 electronic circuits, making it the perfect choice for future engineers! There are easy-to-follow instructions included for assembling each circuit, so kids can learn loads from playing with this toy. Some of the projects include a siren with adjustable volume, a light that flashes, and more. The circuits don’t require tools for building, as the pieces simply snap together.

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9. Fisher Price Kinderbot

Last on our list of coding for kids toys is the cute Kinderbot from Fisher Price. It is perfect for kids in the age range of 3 - 6 years old, and offers three different modes to play in. Essentially, with this toy, kids have to input code to determine where the robot will move to. But, it’s made fun and easy for kids with the use of phrases, bright colors, different shapes and fun light effects. The colorful buttons are easy for kids to press, and there is a booklet of secret codes for when kids are ready to advance to the next level of learning.

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